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Bank misidentifies house for repossession

Since the housing crisis, many people in Florida became unable to make their mortgage payments, and banks processed an unprecedented number of foreclosures. The backlog may have forced some bankers to rush through the process, and they may have incorrectly handled some foreclosures.

When a woman returned from a two-week vacation, her lawn had grown and needed to be mowed, but the problems didn’t stop there. The homeowner wasn’t able to open her house with her keys; instead, she had to break into a window in her own house. There is no indication that the woman had been facing foreclosure.

While the woman was on vacation, a bank had apparently misidentified her home as one they needed to repossess. They changed her locks and removed several of her belongings. Because the lawn needed to be mowed, bank employees assumed that her house was the one they had planned to repossess. Although the bank employees’ GPS had led them to the woman’s house, the house they had intended to repossess is located across the street. It is unknown whether the bank has made any attempts to repossess that house as well.

In the meantime, the woman is struggling to reclaim her possessions from the bank; according to the woman, these items have a total value of $18,000. Instead of issuing an apology, the woman says, the bank has been somewhat hostile toward her.

In cases like these, banks take advantage of people who may be struggling to pay their bills. It is important for consumers in Florida, even those who need debt relief, to report any creditor harassment or unfair treatment. If you’re in this situation, an lawyer may be able to help.

Source: Source: 10 TV, “Vinton County Woman Wants Possessions Back After Bank Tried To Repossess Wrong House,” July 22, 2013

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